Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Nordic Id Stix #1215
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Eddy, Thanks for the question.

    That reader should work for reading temperature, although we have not tested it specifically.

    We are happy to discuss the specifics of your application and sample code request by contacting our customer support team HERE.

    0
    in reply to: Read from FRM2100-AFR tag #1214
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Mike, Thanks for the question.

    You are correct — the 24-digit number is the Electronic Product Code (EPC) of the tag, not the Sensor Code. The Sensor Code (which can indicate moisture) is located in the “Reserved” memory bank of that tag, in (decimal) word address 11. You’ll have to specify that your reader can get the value at that location — maybe by configuring some parameters in its tag-reading application, or writing your own software for it. We have experience with ThingMagic and Nordic ID readers, so if you have trouble with the Scanfob and have access to one of those readers, we can probably give more detailed help for it.

    The Sensor Code will be a value between 0 and 31, and will depend on the presence of water on the sensing area of the tag, and also to some extent on the channel frequency the tag was read on.

    1+
    in reply to: How to read RFM2100 sensor tags #1102
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    This website download issue has now been resolved.

    0
    in reply to: RFMicron’s Temperature Monitoring Solution for Switchgear #990
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    ROI – Return on Investment

    Op-Ex Reduction: Monitor across the network instead of sending a crew in safety gear.

    Improve Up-Time KPIs: Typical substations see failures every two years costing $36k.  Avoid failure.

    Improve Human Safety:

    • $50k for a minor injury
    • $1.5M for serious injury
    • $1.5M for a death

    RFMicron’s Switchgear Monitoring Solution

    RFM3240

    RFM3250

    RFM3254

    RFM3260

    RFM5117 Fixed Reader

    Digital Display


    ORDERING

    1+
    in reply to: Maximum RFM 3250 temperature #964
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Dani, Thanks for the question.

    The normal operating range of RFM’s sensors is between -40°C to +85°C. This is based on the design rules from the semiconductor foundry. Although RFMicron cannot guarantee sensor operation beyond this temperature range, we have conducted limited high temperature experiments of up to 145°C for short time-periods.

    At these elevated temperatures, RFMicron has observed a decreased read range to approximately 2 meters at 100°C and 1 meter at 145°C with degraded precision of 5° to 10° C at 145°C. The approximate error magnitude is expected to increase the further the environmental temperature is from the sensor’s calibration temperature, which is initially pre-set at 30°C.

    0
    in reply to: RFMicron RFM3200-AER sesnor tag #962
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Gatis,

    The information for reading specific memory addresses of the RFM3200 Wireless Flexible Temperature Sensor, which utilizes RFMicron’s Magnus® S3 IC, is accessible by downloading the application note titled “Reading Magnus®-S Sensors”. Click HERE to learn more.

    0
    in reply to: Good readers for RFMicron RFM3200-AER sesnor tag #959
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Gatis,

    Please take a look at the following frequently asked question (click HERE), which includes a table summarizing the readers that have been confirmed to work with RFMicron sensors, up to and including full high-precision temperature access.

    0
    in reply to: MAgnus S sensore code problem #950
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Gatis, Thanks for your question.

    1. Correct, the RFM3200-AER tag will have a TID model number starting with 403.

    2. The RESERVED memory bank does include locations with word addresses C, D, and E, where RFMicron’s sensor data is located. Some RAIN-compliant readers/reader software applications only allow the user to read from words 0, 1, 2, and 3 since these are the locations of password data in traditional RFID devices. RFMicron suggests that you contact the manufacturer of the reader that you’re using and ask how to configure the reader to read from arbitrary locations in the RESERVED bank to access the “E word”.

    0
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Dev: Thanks for the questions.

    1. The CRC code is there purely to provide reassurance that the calibration data has not been accidentally overwritten. The concept is that the user calculates the CRC over the calibration words (using, for example, the sample code provided in RFMicron’s Reading Magnus-S Sensors App Note), and then compares the calculated value to the value stored on the temperature sensor tag. If they match, then the calibration data has not been altered. However, if the user is confident that the calibration data has not been unintentionally modified, then there is no harm in simply ignoring the CRC code.

    2. The “C” value in the referenced formula is the Temperature Code that you want to convert to degrees C.

    Please let us know if you have any other questions as you develop your android application.

    0
    in reply to: Max water depth #904
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Thanks for your question, Ivan.

    1. RFMicron’s temperature sensors will not operate when fully submerged in water or a water/glycol mixture, because the water will shield the sensor’s antenna and would prevent RF-communications between the reader and the sensor. If the RFMicron temperature sensor was mounted or attached to the outside of the fluid container, measuring temperature would be possible.

    2. Additional information about readers that are compatible with RFMicron’s sensors is available by clicking HERE.

    3. There are several industrial cell-phones that have RAIN-compliant reader capability, which can be used to read RFMicron’s sensors.

    4. You can procure RFMicron sensor samples by clicking HERE.

    0
    in reply to: Roofing materials and long term monitoring #903
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Nathan, Thanks for your questions.

    1. Regarding sensor lifespan, RFMicron sensors do not use batteries and are only powered when the sensor is read, which means that for most of the time, the sensor is in an inactive state. Furthermore, the materials used to construct our sensors are highly stable and nearly impervious to corrosion. We also subject our sensor designs to accelerated aging and stress testing during qualification. As such, we believe the operational lifespan of our sensors is at least 15 years.

    2. In terms of reading through a thick layer of building materials, RFMicron sensors can be read through most building materials, including stucco and deck coating. However, if the sensor is integrated with a full-metal roof and the sensor is within several millimeters of the metal, then the roof may shield or interfere with the sensor antenna. In these cases, the sensor would need to be separated from the metal roof by several centimeters.

    3. The RFMicron sensor does not need to be “wet” to detect moisture. Our sensors have been used to determine moisture content of various wood products by being placed in proximity to the wood.

    0
    in reply to: Temperature measurments on rotating parts #902
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    You are correct. The 3 ms is the full time to communicate with the sensor, including the reading request and response from the tag.

    0
    in reply to: Magnus S3 tag chip impedance value #901
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    The impedance values of the Magnus sensor IC’s are documented in RFMicron’s full data sheets. RFMicron has a process that we follow relative to distributing IC data sheets. For details, please contact our customer support team by clicking HERE.

    0
    in reply to: Obtain Tempeture Value #900
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Alex,

    Thanks for your question. The hex value that you read from the EPC memory bank is the user-programmable sensor identification number. The actual sensor data are stored in other memory locations. The details about how to read and interpret RFMicron sensor data can be found in the application note titled “Reading Magnus®-S Sensors”, which you can download by clicking HERE.

    0
    in reply to: Temperature measurments on rotating parts #894
    RFMicron
    RFMicron Ambassador
    • ★★★★

    Thanks for the questions, Mike. We have provided answers to your questions below:

    1. An average single read-time is 3 ms long. In certain cases, the radio transmitter may need to reconfigure its power, which can take approximately 500 ms to adjust. However, once the radio is configured, the sensor can be read every 3 ms.

    2. Yes, each sensor has a unique ID that cannot be changed. Each sensor also has a programmable fast-read ID area that can vary in length.

    3. Regarding readers, please see the following link, which addresses this question: http://community.rfmicron.com/forums/topic/which-readers-work-with-rfmicrons-sensor-tags/ . Also, I encourage you to review our application note titled “Reading Magnus-S Sensors”, which can be downloaded by clicking HERE.

    Please let us know if you have any other questions.

    0
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)